OTL101 – Post 5

In Post 2 I discussed an application of the practical inquiry model. The example I described was from an online course from 2002. Although online courses were relatively new at that time, the course design went well beyond what might be termed “an electronic version of a traditional correspondence course”.  Although a little strange in the early days, it proved to be an effective model of learning and produced some meaningful discussions when the topic was of interest to the students.

The two most important ideas or concepts presented in the course so far relate to the practical inquiry model providing student feedback. The practical inquiry model provides provides an approach to adult learning that  is quantifiable, both in terms of available research and in my own experience with adult learners. The relevance of the student feedback information presented in the course resonates as it reflects both changes in the student and in the delivery medium.

The questions that arise for me from the course concern measurement and evaluation of learning. Do we know enough about online teaching to effectively measure student learning? And what portion of those measurement tools can be automated?

Two specific goals that I would like to achieve are:

  • Developing relevant skills for providing specific feedback to online students
  • Explore more recent research related to the Community of Inquiry model of learning particularly in terms of what the model can measure  in regards to student learning