OTL301 – Post 3

Designing Aligned Learning Experiences

Intended Learning Outcomes

  1. Using point form, students will be able to explain the salient differences between a static and a dynamic web site using 5-6 points that contrast the differences.
  2. In 3-4 short paragraphs, students will be able to describe the key features of a modern operating system

Learning Activities for web sites

  1. From a developer perspective, the student will summarize in point form, using no more than 10 points, the development steps required to build: (a) – a static web site and (b) – a dynamic web site
  2. From an end-user perspective, the student will summarize the differences in the user experience between a static and a dynamic web site. The summary should be in point form. Create your summary using no more than 3-4 points of each category, but ensure that your points describe distinct difference.
  3. Finally, the student is to summarize┬ásalient differences between a static and a dynamic web site using 5-6 points that contrast the differences. As you have seen from the previous two activities, the difference between a static web site and a dynamic web site are very clear from a development perspective. But from an end-user perspective, the differences are far less evident. Think about someone you know who doesn’t know much about computing concepts, except as an end-user. Perhaps a parent or a friend. How would you explain to them the salient differences between a static web site versus a dynamic web site?Note to the student: This last question is a standard interview question for an intermediate web developer position. Many applicants struggle to provide a meaningful answer to this question, often descending into jargon in an an attempt to satisfy the interviewer. It’s not that the question is particularly difficult, but rather that it requires thinking logically to provide a meaningful answer. Please ensure your answer reflects logical thinking!

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David Kumka

David Kumka is a former high school teacher and college instructor who left teaching some time ago. After spending the last 30 odd years as an IT consultant, and stopping along the way to pick up and M.Sc. in IT and a Ph.D. in Information Systems, David has returned to teaching as an OLFM. And is quite happy to be back!

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